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Jumbo Shrimp with Vanilla Bean Beurre Blanc

Image for Jumbo Shrimp with Vanilla Bean Beurre Blanc
plate

Yield

Yield: 24 servings

kikkoman products used:

ingredients

Red Wine Syrup:
4 cups dry red wine
2 tablespoons sugar

Shrimp:
1 pound butter, melted
1 ounce garlic, chopped
6 ounces Kikkoman Panko Japanese Style Bread Crumbs
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 tablespoons chopped parsley
salt and pepper, as needed
4 pounds (about 72) shrimp, peeled and deveined

Vanilla Bean Beurre Blanc:
1 1/2 pounds butter, cold
3 ounces shallots, chopped
1 1/2 cups dry white wine
2 vanilla beans

directions

To make Red Wine Syrup: In non-reactive saucepan, simmer wine until reduced to 2 cups. Add sugar; simmer until reduced to 1 cup.

To make Shrimp: In bowl, mix butter and garlic. In second bowl, mix panko, cheese and parsley; season with salt and pepper. Dip shrimp into butter mixture, then into panko mixture, pressing so that panko adheres. Refrigerate, covered.

To make Vanilla Bean Beurre Blanc: In saucepan, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter. Add shallots and sauté over medium heat until soft. Add wine and simmer until only 1 tablespoon wine remains. Cut remaining butter into 1 tablespoon pieces. Whisk butter into shallot mixture over low heat, 1 tablespoon at a time, until all the butter is incorporated. Slit vanilla beans lengthwise and scrape out seeds; whisk seeds into beurre blanc. Keep warm in bain marie or thermos.

For each serving, to order: Place 3 shrimp in sauté pan or oven-proof dish; bake in 400°F oven for 6 to 8 minutes or until firm. Place 2 tablespoons Vanilla Bean Beurre Blanc in center of plate; arrange shrimp on top. Drizzle 2 teaspoons Red Wine Syrup around shrimp.

Recipe created by Chef John Bubala, Thyme Restaurant(Chicago, IL)

THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE

Even people who love soy sauce and use it all the time are often surprised to learn what it is and how it’s made. We make ours from just four simple ingredients—water, soybeans, wheat, and salt. Those ingredients are transformed through a traditional brewing process—much like making wine or beer—that has remained unchanged for centuries.

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