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Orange Chicken Grab-and-Go Salad

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plate

Yield

50 and 100 Servings

kikkoman products used:

ingredients

50 Servings
12 pounds 13 ounces (6 gallons 1 quart) Romaine lettuce, fresh, chopped
10 pounds 10 ounces Chicken, cooked, IQF Fajita strips, thawed, diced
2 pounds 4 ounces (3 quarts ½ cup) Purple cabbage, fresh, finely shredded
2 pounds 9 ounces (3 quarts ½ cup) Carrots, fresh, shredded
5 pounds 14 ounces (3 quarts ½ cup) Mandarin orange segments, canned, drained
5 ¼ cups Kikkoman Preservative-Free Orange Sauce
1 cup Kikkoman Rice Vinegar
6 ¼ cups Crunchy chow mein noodles

100 Servings
25 pounds 10 ounces (12 ½ gallons) Romaine lettuce, fresh, chopped
21 pounds 4 ounces Chicken, cooked, IQF Fajita strips, thawed, diced
4 pounds 8 ounces (1 ½ gallons 1 cup) Purple cabbage, fresh, finely shredded
5 pounds 2 ounces (1 ½ gallons 1 cup) Carrots, fresh, shredded
11 pounds 12 ounces (1 ½ gallons 1 cup) Mandarin orange segments, canned, drained
2 quarts 2½ cup Kikkoman Preservative-Free Orange Sauce
2 cups Kikkoman Rice Vinegar
3 quarts ½ cup Crunchy chow mein noodles

directions

Place 2 cups of chopped lettuce into each portion container.  Place 3.6 ounces of diced chicken in a mound in one corner of the container.  In the remaining corners place the shredded purple cabbage, shredded carrots, and mandarin orange segments. 

Top salad with 2 tablespoons Kikkoman Preservative-Free Orange Sauce.  Alternately, portion 2 tablespoons (1 ounce) of the sauce into portion cups with lids and place inside the salad container. 

Place 2 tablespoons of crunchy chow mein noodles in the center of each salad.  Cover each salad with a lid and hold at or below 40˚F until service.

 

Orange Chicken Grab-and-Go Salad

THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE

Even people who love soy sauce and use it all the time are often surprised to learn what it is and how it’s made. We make ours from just four simple ingredients—water, soybeans, wheat, and salt. Those ingredients are transformed through a traditional brewing process—much like making wine or beer—that has remained unchanged for centuries.

READ THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE
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