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Hand-Pulled Mongolian Pork with Lettuce Cups

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plate

Yield

Yield: 24 servings

kikkoman products used:

ingredients

Mongolian Pork:
20 pounds pork butt, trimmed of excess fat
8 cups Kikkoman Soy Sauce
8 cups orange juice
2 pounds fresh ginger, crushed
3 cups dried Szechuan chilies
20 pieces star anise

Plating:
3/4 cup oyster sauce
3/4 cup xiao shing wine
1/4 cup Kikkoman Preservative-Free Non-GMO Toasted Sesame Oil
2 1/4 cup vegetable oil
24 cups shredded napa cabbage
12 cups bean sprouts
1/4 cup minced garlic
1/4 cup minced ginger
6 cups julienned scallions
12 red Fresno chiles, sliced
120 butter lettuce leaves or iceberg lettuce cups
Kikkoman Hoisin Sauce

directions

To make Mongolian Pork, in large pot, combine pork, soy sauce, orange juice, ginger, Szechuan chiles and star anise. Add enough water to cover pork; bring to a boil. Transfer pot to 350°F oven; cook 2-3 hours or until pork is fork-tender. Remove pork; cool and shred by hand. Strain braising liquid; chill and remove solidified fat.

For each serving, to order, mix together 1 1/2 tablespoons reserved pork braising liquid, 1 1/2 teaspoons oyster sauce, 1 1/2 teaspoons xaoshing wine and 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil. In wok or sauté pan, heat 1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil. Add 8 ounces pulled pork; stir-fry until seared. Add 1 cup cabbage; mix well. Add 1/2 cup bean sprouts, 1/2 teaspoon garlic, 1/2 teaspoon ginger and liquid mixture. Stir-fry 1-2 minutes or until cabbage is wilted; add 1/4 cup scallions and half a Fresno chile. Mound pork on platter with 5 pieces lettuce and a bowl of hoisin sauce on the side.

Recipe by Chef Alexander Ong, Betelnut (San Francisco, CA)

THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE

Even people who love soy sauce and use it all the time are often surprised to learn what it is and how it’s made. We make ours from just four simple ingredients—water, soybeans, wheat, and salt. Those ingredients are transformed through a traditional brewing process—much like making wine or beer—that has remained unchanged for centuries.

READ THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE
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