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Soy-Sesame Steamed Snapper

plate

Yield

1 Fish, Approximately 4 Servings

kikkoman products used:

ingredients

Snapper
1 Branzino or Flounder, Whole, 10” to 12”, approximately 1 1/2 pounds
2 teaspoons Sea Salt
2 tablespoons Kikkoman Lime Ponzu Citrus Seasoned Dressing & Sauce
¼ cup Ginger, Fresh, Peeled and Julienned
¼ cup Fermented Black Beans, Coarsely Chopped
6 Napa Cabbage, Large Leaves

 

Vegetable Salad
½ cup Red Bell Peppers, Julienne
½ cup Green Onions, Julienne
¼ cup Jalapeno Peppers, Paper Thin Rings
¼ cup Fresno Red Chilies, Paper Thin Rings
½ cup Cilantro sprigs
½ cup Kikkoman Less Sodium Soy Sauce, Heated

directions

Snapper:

Score snapper slicing several bias cuts into the flesh, approximately 2 inches apart, on both sides. Season both sides lightly with sea salt and Ponzu, taking care to season inside the scoring. Line a bamboo steamer basket (or similar perforated pan) with large leaves of Napa cabbage. Place snapper directly on cabbage leaves. The cabbage will keep the fish moist while steaming and will help to lift the fish from the steamer basket after being cooked.

Season the topside of the fish generously with fermented black beans and fresh ginger and steam for 10 to 12 minutes, depending on size. The flesh will be opaque when done.

 

To Order:
Carefully remove fish by lifting the cabbage leaves and transfer to a very hot metal serving platter.
Top the fish with approximately 2 cups vegetable salad and pour heated soy sauce over the top to wilt the salad and sizzle the platter. 

 

Service Note: 
The best way to serve the whole fish is family-style, and for guests to each take some of the salad and pick bite-sized pieces of the soft and succulent fillets.  

THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE

Even people who love soy sauce and use it all the time are often surprised to learn what it is and how it’s made. We make ours from just four simple ingredients—water, soybeans, wheat, and salt. Those ingredients are transformed through a traditional brewing process—much like making wine or beer—that has remained unchanged for centuries.

READ THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE
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