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Sweet & Spicy Lacquered Ribs

Image for Sweet & Spicy Lacquered Ribs
plate

Yield

8 servings (per 1/2 gallon bottle)

kikkoman products used:

ingredients

2 lbs St. Louis-Style Pork Ribs, cut into half rack sections
1 cup Kikkoman Preservative-Free Poke Sauce
1/2 cup Honey
1 teaspoon Fresh Garlic, minced
1 teaspoon Salt
1 teaspoon Black Pepper, ground

 

Garnish:
Green Onions, sliced
Toasted Sesame Seeds

 

Recipe Yield:
4-6 servings depending on menu application

directions

  1. Sprinkle ribs with salt and pepper.
  2. Whisk together Kikkoman Poke Sauce and honey. Place rib racks in a large bowl, add sauce and combine until well coated.
  3. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let ribs marinate for a minimum of 1 hour (up to overnight) refrigerated, turning occasionally to coat.
  4. Pre-heat oven to 325°F.
  5. Remove ribs from marinade and arrange, bone-side down, on a baking sheet, lined with a large sheet of foil (place ribs on one side of foil allowing space to fold foil over). Fold foil over ribs and seal edges tightly to form a packet around the ribs.
  6. While the ribs are in the oven, transfer marinade to a 2-qt. saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-high and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, until thick and syrupy, about 20 minutes. Set aside.
  7. Bake ribs for 2-1/2 hours. Remove from oven and let ribs rest at room temperature, still sealed in foil, for 1 hour. (Do not open; ribs will continue to cook and become tender.)
  8. Carefully open foil. Transfer rib rack to cutting board.  Cut between bones to separate ribs.
  9. Baste ribs with reduced sauce until well coated and glazed. Transfer ribs to a serving platter and garnish with green onions and toasted sesame seeds.

THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE

Even people who love soy sauce and use it all the time are often surprised to learn what it is and how it’s made. We make ours from just four simple ingredients—water, soybeans, wheat, and salt. Those ingredients are transformed through a traditional brewing process—much like making wine or beer—that has remained unchanged for centuries.

READ THE STORY OF SOY SAUCE
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